Interactive Harm Reduction tools or “I just want to play with stuff”

This week marks my discovery of two very different yet equally great interactive harm reduction resources.

Global state of harm reduction e-tool

Ever wondered how many countries provide needle syringe programs in prisons? (the answer is 12).

Thanks to the Global State of Harm Reduction e-tool developed by Harm Reduction International, this kind of information is easily accessible.  Users of the tool can access information presented in a variety of regional and global maps examining a range of policy initiatives that support harm reduction.  Users of the tool can compare the state of harm reduction amongst different nations, accessing pictorial representations demonstrating the types of harm reduction programs that exist (or not) in different nations.  Want to see which countries provide opiate substitution progams?  Simply select your search terms and the e-tool will present a colour coded map signifying which countries provide opiate substitution programs and which don’t.

Global State of Harm Reduction e-tool

AIVL Vein Care Guide

The second of my interactive discoveries this week has been the Australian Injecting and Illicit Drug Users League (AIVL) Vein Care Guide.  A great resource for both harm reduction professionals and drug users alike, the vein care guide provides a range of text based, interactive and animation based resources that inform appropriate vein care for injecting drug users.  My personal favourite is the section regarding injecting sites on the body.  This handy tool allows end users to highlight different body parts on what appears to be hand drawn male and female figures.  Once a body part is selected, relevant  harm reduction information pertinent to using that part of the body as an injecting site is provided in the form of text and diagrams.

AIVL Vein Care Guide

The Importance of Interactivity

Interactivity for the sake of saying I created something interactive is well… lame.  That said both of these tools make the information they convey more accessible.  The ability to interface with information in a kinaesthetic and visual manner is much more appropriate for many people’s learning styles and in many instances will mean that people are far more willing to explore the information provided mainly because people often like to, well…just play with stuff.

I would love to hear about others discoveries of interactive tools that support harm reduction.

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  1. […] Interactive Harm Reduction tools or “I just want to play with stuff” This week marks my discovery of two very different yet equally great interactive harm reduction resources. Global state of harm reduction e-tool Ever wondered how many countries provide needle sy… Source: stonetreeaus.wordpress.com […]



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